Rapid Pathogen Screening

THE IMPORTANCE OF MAKING THE RIGHT DIAGNOSIS

Pink eye is an inflammation or infection of the thin lining inside your eyelid and part of your eyeball. This lining is known as the conjunctiva. When the small blood vessels in the conjunctiva get inflamed, they become more prominent and this causes the eye to turn pink or red.

Knowing the source of the pink eye infection you have makes a crucial difference in your treatment plan.

The three most common types of pink eye are:

  • Viral conjunctivitis – Up to 65%1 of all pink eye cases are caused by a virus. The most common form of virus is known as the “adenovirus.”2 This form of pink eye is highly contagious and there are no currently available drugs for treating viral pink eye.
  • Bacterial conjunctivitis – More common in children, pink eye caused by bacteria can be treated with a prescription for antibiotic eyedrops or ointment. Generally, even without medication, this form of pink eye will clear up in just a few days without any lasting effects on the eyes.
  • Allergic conjunctivitis – Like any allergy, this type of pink eye can be caused by pet dander, pollens, molds and other common substances. There are specific antihistamine drops that can be used to treat this type of pink eye.

References

  1. Marangon FB, Miller D, Alfonso E. Laboratory results in ocular viral diseases: implications in clinical-laboratory correlation. Arq Bras Oftalmol 2007;70:189-94
  2. Infectious Agents Surveillance Center of Japan. Viruses isolated from the eye, Japan, 1990-1994. Infectious Agents Surveillance Report 1995;16:97-98

THE RIGHT TEST TO GET YOU THE RIGHT TREATMENT

In the past, the only way for doctors to confirm the cause of a patient’s pink eye was to rely on just a physical exam or to wait on time-consuming and costly lab tests (cell cultures or PCR).

Now, just a small, easy-to-collect eye fluid sample is all it takes to get accurate results in just 10 minutes. Your doctor or Health Care Provider can do the test during your first visit.

The RPS Adeno Detector is the only rapid, in-office test available to help your Health Care Professional make the right pink eye diagnosis and treatment decisions to protect your eyes.
Having the right information can help you and your doctor:

  • Reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions
  • Help you prevent antibiotic resistance
  • Help you protect others from the spread of infection
  • Reduce serious complications
  • Help you decide when to go back to school or work

IS AN ANTIBIOTIC RIGHT FOR ME – OR MY CHILD?

There is a growing concern in the medical community about “antibiotic resistance.” This means that over time, as you use antibiotics, your body becomes tolerant of them until the drugs no longer fight infections.

One of the ways you can protect yourself against antibiotic resistance is to take the drugs only when they are truly necessary to improve your health.
With a diagnosis of viral pink eye, you don’t need antibiotics. The drugs will not fight the infection and could end up causing more damage in long run by:

  • Delaying proper treatment
  • Making you think you’re safe to go back to work or school and putting others at risk
  • Increasing your antibiotic resistance

KNOW WHEN IT’S RIGHT TO RETURN TO WORK OR SCHOOL

Depending on what type of pink eye you have, you may need to remain isolated. You don’t want to spread the infection to others.

  • Viral conjunctivitis typically lasts from 7-21 days. You should remain away from public contact as long as you have symptoms, especially pink eye color or tearing.
  • Bacterial conjunctivitis The contagious phase of bacterial pink eye lasts from the time symptoms appear until there is no more discharge from your eye. This is typically just a few days, or until 24 hours after you start taking a prescription antibiotic.
  • Allergic conjunctivitis This type of pink eye is not contagious.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MAKING THE RIGHT DIAGNOSIS

Pink eye is an inflammation or infection of the thin lining inside your eyelid and part of your eyeball. This lining is known as the conjunctiva. When the small blood vessels in the conjunctiva get inflamed, they become more prominent and this causes the eye to turn pink or red.

Knowing the source of the pink eye infection you have makes a crucial difference in your treatment plan. The three most common types of pink eye are:

  • Viral conjunctivitis – Up to 65%1 of all pink eye cases are caused by a virus. The most common form of virus is known as the “adenovirus.”2 This form of pink eye is highly contagious and there are no currently available drugs for treating viral pink eye.
  • Bacterial conjunctivitis – More common in children, pink eye caused by bacteria can be treated with a prescription for antibiotic eyedrops or ointment. Generally, even without medication, this form of pink eye will clear up in just a few days without any lasting effects on the eyes.
  • Allergic conjunctivitis – Like any allergy, this type of pink eye can be caused by pet dander, pollens, molds and other common substances. There are specific antihistamine drops that can be used to treat this type of pink eye.

References

  1. Marangon FB, Miller D, Alfonso E. Laboratory results in ocular viral diseases: implications in clinical-laboratory correlation. Arq Bras Oftalmol 2007;70:189-94
  2. Infectious Agents Surveillance Center of Japan. Viruses isolated from the eye, Japan, 1990-1994. Infectious Agents Surveillance Report 1995;16:97-98